SCIENCE OF KOJI

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Ancientics uses koji (the Japanese name), a steamed rice infused with beneficial mold (Aspergillus oryzae).

 
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beautiful aroma and delicious flavor

During multiplication, this ancient mold koji generates various digestive enzymes, such as proteases, a protein that forms amino acids, and amylase, which break down complex carbohydrates into more easily digestible forms. It can also produce peptides that have the effects of reducing blood lipids, blood pressure and blood sugar (Kim, An Tsung, 1999, Japanese Brewing Association Journal). 

It also adds a beautiful aroma and delicious flavor and is used in many traditional Japanese foods such as miso, soy sauce, sake and vinegar. it has been proclaimed as Japanese national mold by The Brewing Society of Japan. 

Long journey

Koji is behind many worlds-renowned Asian cuisines dating back to the BC era.  It is used in making Douchi, a salty fermented black soybean paste, that Chinese use to “sateen” certain dishes.  It was beloved by the “privileged” classes in China as discovered in a 1972 excavation of a sealed tomb of a high-ranking lady who may have been the first wife of the Marquis of Tai in 165 BC.  It also is mentioned in Chapter 69 of the Records of the Grand Historian (90 BC) - “mold-fermented cereal grains and salty fermented soybean.”

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